Podcast: Selfies, Hotel Meeting Design and the Hunger Games

Show 299  Podcast: Selfies, Hotel Meeting Design and the Hunger Games

selfie 300x166 Podcast: Selfies, Hotel Meeting Design and the Hunger Games

 

 

 

 

 

 

On todays show 299 we have 3 great segments.

1)   Lemme Take a Selfie with Dana Freker Doody from the Expo Group

Dana explains a little on how to take advantage of this selfie trend to broadcast your brand out online from your convention or trade show.

Links:

PixeSocial

SocialPoint

Guerilla Style

2)   4 things meeting professionals can learn from the leading hotel chains’ meeting-space design research

PCMA convene magazines exec editor Christopher Durso and editor and chief Michelle Russell they share the main takeaways from the Convene April issue cover story written by Chris: “Beyond the Ballroom” — how hotels are using design labs and field tests to answer a not-so-simple question: How should their meeting space look, feel, and perform?

The full story can be found at www.pcma.org/convene.

(Complimentary subscriptions to the magazine are available to qualified meeting professionals. Simply click on the “subscribe” button on the pcma.org/convene landing page.)

3) And then to close it out since I was on vacation last week and I watched the Hunger Games I have 5 ways event organizers can learn from the Hunger Games with Mike McAllen

Image source and more selfie info.

Transcripts to come!

 

Podcast: Event planning checklists, online RFP creation, avoiding audiovisual surprises

Event planning checklists, online RFP creation, avoiding audiovisual surprises
Show 298

Event 289 300x163 Podcast: Event planning checklists, online RFP creation, avoiding audiovisual surprises

 

 

 

 

 

 

On our show today we have 3 great segments.

1) Event Planning Checklist for Workshops and Seminars
With Pat Ahasey
2) BEFORE You Send Your RFP—5 Local Conditions to Consider
With Christine “Shimo” Shimaskaki
3) 5 Ways To Avoid Surprise AV fees
With Jon Trask

6 year Anniversary of Meetings Podcast!   Wowza

Event Planning Checklist for Workshops and Seminars
Pat Ahaesy, CMP. CSEP
Great tips and tricks for planners to prepare.
Pat’s company, P&V Enterprises is headquartered in New York City.
Where you can find Pat (Better question is where isn’t Pat?)
www.pnventerprises.com.
www.linkedin.com/in/patahaesy?
www.linkedin.com/company/pv-enterprises

https://www.facebook.com/pat.ahaesy?

https://www.facebook.com/PNVEnterprises

https://twitter.com/pnv123?

https://twitter.com/pnventerprises?

www.pinterest.com/pahaesy

https://plus.google.com/+PatriciaAhaesy?

https://plus.google.com/114064439521027434702?

Blog  pnventerprises.com/event-production-blog

BEFORE You Send Your RFP—5 Local Conditions to Consider
Christine Shimo Shimasaki
Managing Director of empowerMINT.com and event impact calculator  Destination Marketing Association International
@Shimosan
www.empowerMINT.com

There is a lot of industry talk about the volume of RFPs but what I think we should focus on is the quality of the RFP itself.  Even veteran planners need to think about how their RFP will be receive, it’s after all a reflection of your meeting and how you expect to be handled.  So let’s be fully informed about the five conditions, which affect the room demand of the destinations and hotels you’re considering.  Key conversations with your CVB experts up front which educate you about how to best construct your RFP for favorable responses.

If you’d like to know more about what information to include in your RFP and how to tailor it for the destinations, join our free 30 minute webinar on April 24th at 1pm EST with Jeanette Alvarez, CMP, PMP, Director Account Operations of Experient and Nathan Tollet, Director of Sales, Greater Houston CVB.  Download the link
 
Download a free excel RFP workbook from the Convention Industry Council APEX Standards Committee, which contains templates for single hotel meetings, citywide, event technology, DMC & transportation services, and general service contractor.  Download this link

5 ways to avoid surprise AV fees  
Jon Trask from AVforPlanners.com
1)    Negotiate Up Front
2)    The Ins and Outlets
3)    Go Into Labor
4)    Avoid Service Charge Surprises
5)    The Other stuff
From Jon Trask from AVforPlanners.com
Jon has been in the meetings an events industry for 3000 years and holds the CMP and CMM designations.  He is a great guy and email him at Jon(at)avforplanners.com or at grassshackroad.com
Links for More Information:
http://trstimson.com/strategy/house-exclusivity-value-proposition/ In-House Exclusivity and Value Proposition
http://trstimson.com/avindustry/discussions-on-third-party-provider-contracts-in-meeting-venues/#more-1067
http://www.slideshare.net/slideshow/embed_code/32044976

Transcripts:

[Read more...]

Podcast: Secrets to building community and fanatical attendees for your conference| Facebook changes

Show 288 Podcast: Secrets to building community and fanatical attendees for your conference.

Mike 300x189 Podcast: Secrets to building community and fanatical attendees for your conference| Facebook changesTranscripts are coming for this episode if would rather read then listen.  Below are all the fine folks who gave up some time and knowledge to spend a little time in your earbuds.

Where are you listening? Take a picture of yourself (selfie) and #meetingspodcast on Instagram

Thanks for listening to the Meetings Podcast.  The Meetings Podcast is sponsored by IMEX America and AVforPlanners.com? The Meeting Planners podcast source for what’s new and exciting in meetings and events industry

Todays Segments:

1- Jordan Schwartz & Jen Pitts from Pathable.com
Facebook recently announced changes to News Feed status updates. We discuss what this means for Facebook Pages and event marketers. Some best practices are shared.
Link to Jordans blog post about ths Facebook topic: http://blog.pathable.com/beware-facebook-is-changing-the-rules

2- Learning from Pioneer Nation.  What made the attendees of Pioneer nation such rabid fans?  What can corporate meeting or conference organizers learn from Pioneer Nation.
http://pioneernation.com

Segment Producers this week (In order of appearance)

Mike McAllen

Jordan Schwartz
Jennifer Pitts
Kerstin Hammes
Kim Reid
Patrick Larsen
Lacey Hopkins
Thursday Bram
Isaac Watson

Bios:
Mike McAllen

Mike brings his hundreds of proven worldwide resources to the fresh, creative, fast paced boutique environment that his meetings and video production company Grass Shack Events & Media has established.  Mike has an eclectic background which leads him to the communications world. Several years of firefighting instilled a hearty work ethic and the importance of teamwork to get a job done right and the love of helping people.
Mike is also the founder of three other products EventCamp.org, AVforPlanners.com, MeetingsPodcast.com all help the meetings and events industries learn about event technology and social media in events and meetings.?Mike’s list of repeat clients for the past ten years at Grass Shack Events & Media includes Oracle, MySQL, Blackboard, Hilton Hotels, Hewlett Packard, Yahoo, Wells Fargo, Siemens Medical Solutions, PepsiCo, Genzyme, Sanofi, BiogenIdec, Thompson Reuters, Vantagescore,  GAP, Restoration Hardware among many more.    @mmcallen   GrassShackRoad.com avforplanners.com  www.linkedin.com/in/mikemcallen

Jordan Schwartz

Jordan Schwartz twitter 300x203 Podcast: Secrets to building community and fanatical attendees for your conference| Facebook changesJordan Schwartz is the CEO and Founder of Pathable, Inc. Jordan has a BS from Brown University and a Master’s Degree in Social Psychology from the University of Washington. Jordan worked for over a decade at Microsoft developing consumer facing communication software and authoring over a dozen patents before founding Pathable, Inc. with the aim to revolutionize the conference attendee experience. Pathable has been successfully serving corporate and association customers since 2008.

 

Jordan’s LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/jschwa   twitter.com/@jojoschwa
Pathable.com?    https://twitter.com/pathable
https://www.linkedin.com/company/pathable-inc.
https://www.facebook.com/pathable.for.events

Jennifer Pitts

jen pitts 300x128 Podcast: Secrets to building community and fanatical attendees for your conference| Facebook changesDirector of Marketing at Pathable.  Jennifer’s experience is a blend of startup and corporate marketing and operations. Prior to Pathable, she managed social, event and paid marketing programs for tech startup, Gist, which was acquired by BlackBerry in 2011. While employed at BlackBerry, Jennifer managed Product and Partner Marketing for Facebook, Twitter and LinkedIn. She also focused on influencer and advocate marketing programs.

@jlpitts
https://www.linkedin.com/in/jenniferleepitts
Pathable.com  ?https://twitter.com/pathable
https://www.linkedin.com/company/pathable-inc.
https://www.facebook.com/pathable.for.event

Kerstin Hammes

kerstin Hames 300x120 Podcast: Secrets to building community and fanatical attendees for your conference| Facebook changesFounded Fluent in 2012. Teach German and English to students all over the world, and also offer classes in Blogging and Online Marketing in Northern England.
Beyond blogging, she also loves promoting language learning as a public speaker. She been a speaker at Careers Events at Lancaster University and local schools.
@fluentlanuage
kerstin (at) fluentlanguage.co.uk
www.fluentlanguage.co.uk
https://www.linkedin.com/in/khammes

Kim Reid

Kim Reid twitter 300x146 Podcast: Secrets to building community and fanatical attendees for your conference| Facebook changesKim is a physician of classical Chinese medicine and practices in Venice, California.
@KimmyReid
KimReideasternmedicine (at)gmail.com
310-853-2325
https://www.facebook.com/pages/Kimberly-Reid-LAc-Physician-of-Chinese-Medicine

Pat Larsen

Pat Larsen 300x126 Podcast: Secrets to building community and fanatical attendees for your conference| Facebook changesPat grew up in Southern California. He went to the US Air Force Academy for undergrad and Chicago Booth for my MBA. Pat is:
-Helicopter pilot (combat search&rescue, SAR, logistics)
-Assistant Professor of Naval History at Illinois Institute of Tech
-Investment banking associate at Lincoln International- middle market M&A. Only lasted a year. Loved the people- hated the work.  Can’t say enough good things about the firm and enough negative things about working in finance…
-Hedge fund analyst specializing in health care stocks- Torrey Pines Health Care research
@patricklarsen
Pat(at)happinesstornado.com
http://happinesstornado.com

Lacey Hopkins

Lacey Hopkins 300x145 Podcast: Secrets to building community and fanatical attendees for your conference| Facebook changesLacey is the founder of Lacey Hopkins Coaching, a entrepreneurial coaching firm located in the heart of Washington, DC. She coaches executives, small business owners, and entrepreneurial hopefuls to have successful businesses and great lives.
A business owner herself, Lacey understands what entrepreneurs need and helps them to: identify what problem they are trying to solve, create a concrete plan to get where they want to go, and execute the plan with velocity that leads to successful businesses. Lacey has a BS from Winthrop University, and an MS from Miami University. Originally from multiple states in the Southeast, she now calls Capitol Hill, DC home.
@laceyhopkins
laceyhopkins.com
Book to check out: Spark Your Career

Thursday Bram

Thursday Bram 300x182 Podcast: Secrets to building community and fanatical attendees for your conference| Facebook changesThursday Bram has written for CNET, GigaOm, Lifehack and a variety of other sites it’s quite likely you’ve heard of. It’s also quite likely she knows what she’s talking about when it comes to writing for a living. She handles all my writing work through Hyper Modern Writing She also takes on creative business consulting projects through her business, Hyper Modern Consulting. She also has been known to take on a few speaking gigs, as well.

 

@thursdayb
ThursdayBram.com
HyperModernWriting.com

Ryan Delk

Ryan Delk 300x123 Podcast: Secrets to building community and fanatical attendees for your conference| Facebook changesRyan is growing Gumroad, a game changing early-stage startup that’s democratizing online commerce HQ’d in San Francisco, CA.  Before diving in at Gumroad, he worked remotely for Square while at school, as well as on Socialfied, a digital strategy company for small businesses that he co-founded my Sophomore year of school.
He also spent time in Nairobi, Kenya helping tech entrepreneurs develop, launch, grow and fund successful tech-driven business ventures in East Africa through the iHub Nairobi. As an extension of that, he was involved in the formation and launch of the recently-announced Savannah Fund, an early-stage investment fund focused on East African tech startups.
@delk
r(at)gumroad.com
Gumroad.com

Isaac B Watson

Issac Watson 300x121 Podcast: Secrets to building community and fanatical attendees for your conference| Facebook changesWith background in graphic design, project management, community organizing, conference production, marketing, and communications. His first foray into the maker world was with his jewelry business, Focal Length Designs, and in doing so became involved with I Heart Art: Portland, a three-year community project that he spearheaded offering professional development and networking opportunities to Portland-based makers. He draws additional experience from several years of work in the communications office of a nonprofit art college and museum, and works on the production team for both Pioneer Nation and the World Domination Summit.
@IBWatson
MakersNation.org

Others mentioned in this podcast:
Chris Guillebeau

Chris Gullibeau 300x139 Podcast: Secrets to building community and fanatical attendees for your conference| Facebook changesChris Guillebeau is an American entrepreneur, nonfiction author, blogger and speaker. He is best known for The Art of Non-Conformity blog and book. He has also written guides for travel and small business topics under the brand Unconventional Guides. He organizes the annual World Domination Summit in Portland, Oregon.[1] The Art of Non-Conformity blog discusses entrepreneurship, travel, and personal development topics; its traffic grew substantially after the online publication of A Brief Guide to World Domination in 2008. The site has an Alexa ranking of under 30,000[2] and is among the top 15,000 most visited sites in the United States.
@chrisguillebeau
chrisguillebeau.com
100startup.com

Jolie Guillebeau

Jolie Guillebeau 300x193 Podcast: Secrets to building community and fanatical attendees for your conference| Facebook changesCreate something everyday. Find Beauty Everywhere. Learn and make stuff. Smile
@joliekg
http://jolieguillebeau.com/

 

 

 

Terry Starbucker

starbucker 300x138 Podcast: Secrets to building community and fanatical attendees for your conference| Facebook changesOwner of Professional Development consultancy focusing on Business Strategy & Execution, Leadership, Customer Care and Social Media
@starbucker
http://www.terrystarbucker.com/

 

 

Chris Brogan

chris brogan 300x128 Podcast: Secrets to building community and fanatical attendees for your conference| Facebook changesPublisher and CEO of Owner Magazine, a business magazine helping you improve your worth by growing your capabilities and connections. He is a sought-after keynote speaker who has addressed crowds of thousands, been on the Dr Phil show, and once presented to a princess. Chris has consulted with companies you know like Disney, Microsoft, Coke, Titleist, Pepsico, Google, Motorola, and many more. He is the New York Times Bestselling author of six books and counting, including The Impact Equation,
@chrisbrogan

http://www.chrisbrogan.com/

New Book:  The Freaks Shall Inherit the Earth

Thank you to all the segment producer Jordan Schwartz, all our above guests.

Special thanks to IMEX America our fantastic sponser.
You can find me Mike McAllen at my meetings and video Production Company Grass Shack Events & Media or at AVforPlanners.com with my pal Jon Trask.

So again if you enjoy listening to the meetingspodcast consider subscribing through itunes and leave us a review. Really helps us get more listeners……
Last request-  thing is if you take a instagram selfie picture of yourself right now–where you are listening to the show that would be cool post it  up on Instagram with the hashtag #Meetingspodcast.

Of course if you have any questions or comments please send them to Meetingspodcast (at) gmail.com  Or call me on my cell phone- 925 699 3190 I would love to talk to you….. Skype me at mike mcallen.  Lets talk!

We will see you all next week.

Transcripts:

[Read more...]

287 Meetings Podcast CMM Certificate Resolution, Social Media Week Tips, Won’t You Be My Neighbor?

287 300x300 287 Meetings Podcast CMM Certificate Resolution, Social Media Week Tips, Won’t You Be My Neighbor?Meetings Podcast CMM Certificate Resolution, Social Media Week Tips, Won’t You Be My Neighbor?

Where are you listening? Take a picture of yourself (selfie) and #meetingspodcast on Instagram.

Thanks for listening to the Meetings Podcast.

The Meetings Podcast is sponsored by IMEX America and AVforPlanners.com.  The Meeting Planners podcast source for what’s new and exciting in meetings and events industry

 

 

 

Todays Segments:

1) Lynn Randall
Tips and interesting takeaways for meetings, conferences and events from February’s Social Media Week in New York.

2) Dana Freker Doody
Title: Won’t You Be My Neighbor?

Neighbors at trade shows can help fellow exhibitors have a great show, but they also can make each other miserable. Convention managers can help the situation with some “proactive parenting.”

3) Mike McAllen & Jon Trask on CMM Program

4) CMM Special Report with Jon Trask and Greg Ruby

Segment Producers this week (In order of appearance)

Mike McAllen

Jon Trask

Lynn Randall

Dana Freker Doody

Greg Ruby

Mike McAllen

Mike brings his hundreds of proven worldwide resources to the fresh, creative, fast paced boutique environment that his meetings and video production company Grass Shack Events & Media has established.  Mike has an eclectic background which leads him to the communications world. Several years of firefighting instilled a hearty work ethic and the importance of teamwork to get a job done right and the love of helping people. Mike is also the founder of three other products EventCamp.org, AVforPlanners.com, MeetingsPodcast.com all help the meetings and events industries learn about event technology and social media in events and meetings. Mike’s list of repeat clients for the past ten years at Grass Shack Events & Media includes Oracle, MySQL, Blackboard, Hilton Hotels, Hewlett Packard, Yahoo, Wells Fargo, Siemens Medical Solutions, PepsiCo, Genzyme, Sanofi, BiogenIdec, Thompson Reuters, Vantagescore,  GAP, Restoration Hardware among many more.

@mmcallen

GrassShackRoad.com

AVforPlanners.com

www.linkedin.com/in/mikemcallen

Jon Trask

Co founder at AVforPlanners.com.

You can find Jon at Jon(At)AVforPlanners.com. Jon has offer a free show evaluation to Meetings Planners and organizers for their next meeting. A $1500 value. All you have to do is email Jon and say you heard the offer on the podcast.  Jon has been a member of MPI since 1994, Jon earned his CMP designation in 2003. Jon has spent the last 20+ years in the audio visual and production business. This experience, which cuts across so many different types of AV support while dealing in logistics, pre-production and project management, along with spending many years in sales give him a unique view of the disparate elements required to create a successful relationships, and ultimately to successfully support a meeting of any size. Jon was named “Meeting Professional of the Year” by the Orange County Chapter of MPI Jon keynote “Language of AV”  he has spoken to numerous meeting and events association and college classes at UCSD, OCC and CMP study groups on the subject of basic AV for planners.

@jontrask Jon@avforplanners.com   AVforPlanners.com

Lynn Randall

Managing Member

Randall Insights LLC

In her role as the head of Randall Insights, Lynn is passionate about helping her clients and the industry improve the performance of their meetings, events,  incentive, and recognition programs.  Her consulting practice has included all aspects of recognition strategy, event design, implementation, and measurement, with special emphasis on: cooking up the right recipe of digital solutions to enhance a meeting, event, or incentive program applying the lessons of neuroscience and macroergonomics to improve the lasting impact of the event experience supercharging attendee engagement and interactivity extracting the story from event data to provide a blueprint for action

You can find Lynn Randall twitter at @LcatRandall

https://twitter.com/LCatRandall

And check out her website at Randall Insights.com

http://www.randallinsights.com/Randall_Insights/Home.html

Dana Freker Doody

The Expo Group, Vice President of Corporate Communications

Dana oversees all communication materials for in-house and client-side programs plus takes an active role in the innovative processes resulting in the creation of strategic and personalized experiential solutions. She is active in social media networks and has developed personalized solutions for several clients to take advantage of the impact of digital tools on trade shows in particular. Dana is a 13-year veteran of The Expo Group, a general services contractor and exhibit house, and the industry, to which she brings a strong service background from her days at Disneyland and a communications background forged in the newspaper industry. Her bachelor of arts degrees in journalism and in history were earned at Southern Methodist University.

Mom to a 10-year-old sports nut, Dana enjoys cheering at whatever is in season and supporting charities in her local community. Dana is often heard speaking at industry conferences and meetings and otherwise questioning the status quo in our industry.  Email: ddoody at theexpogroup.com

Website: http://theexpogroup.com?Blog:

http://theexpogroup.com/blog

Tweets: http://twitter.com/theexpogroup

Videos: http://youtube.com/theexpogroup

Fun: http://facebook.com/theexpogroup

Connect: http://bit.ly/theexpogroupLinkedIn

Greg Ruby

Started social media and event consulting business that has given him the ability to use his talents across a wide range of tasks for my clients. He have assisted many clients to expand their audiences and create content online. This company also provides association management services for smaller organizations. In addition, we offer training to organizations in the areas of responsible alcohol management in the hospitality industry and making your events more environmentally responsible.

Twitter:  @gregruby

?http://gregrubyconsulting.com/

You can find Mike McAllen at his meetings and video production company Grass Shack Events & Media or at AVforPlanners.com with my pal Jon Trask.
So again if you enjoy listening to the meetingspodcast consider subscribing through itunes and leave us a review.
Last request-  thing is if you take a instagram selfie picture of yourself right now–where you are listening to the show that would be cool post it  up on Instagram with the hashtag #Meetingspodcast.

If you have any questions or comments please send them to Meetingspodcast (at) gmail.com  Or call me on my cell phone- 925 699 3190 I would love to talk to you….. 

Thank you for listening.

Transcripts

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286 Meetings Podcast Mike on Mics, Social Media mistakes events make, Do we really need a rehearsal?

Mike on Mics 300x198 286 Meetings Podcast Mike on Mics, Social Media mistakes events make, Do we really need a rehearsal?Where are you listening? Take a picture of yourself (selfie) and #meetingspodcast on Instagram!
Thanks for listening to the Meetings Podcast.  The Meetings Podcast is sponsored by IMEX America and AVforPlanners.com
The Meeting Planners podcast source for what’s new and exciting in meetings and events industry

Todays Segments:

1- Julius Solaris -Social Media Mistakes Events Make
Julius talks about some common mistakes event organizers make using Social Media for their events.

2-Pat Ahaesy - Do we really need a tech rehearsal?
Pat talks about how important tech rehearsals are for live events.  Not only for the tech team  but for the the speakers and ultimately the audience.

3- Mike on Mics-
Mike McAllen brings in two Microphone innovators from Crowdmics.com and Getcatchbox.com to talk about new ways to engage audiences using mobile devices and a throwable microphone.

Segment Producers this week (In order of appearance)
 Mike McAllen
Julius Solaris
Pat Ahaesy,CMP, CSEP
Tim Holladay
Mikelis Studers 
Mike McAllen
Mike brings his hundreds of proven worldwide resources to the fresh, creative, fast paced boutique environment that his meetings and video production company Grass Shack Events & Media has established.  Mike has an eclectic background which leads him to the communications world. Several years of firefighting instilled a hearty work ethic and the importance of teamwork to get a job done right and the love of helping people.
Mike is also the founder of three other products EventCamp.org, AVforPlanners.com, MeetingsPodcast.com all help the meetings and events industries learn about event technology and social media in events and meetings.
@mmcallen
GrassShackRoad.com
avforplanners.com
www.linkedin.com/in/mikemcallen

Julius Solaris
Julius is the editor of EventManagerBlog.com. Started in 2007, EventManagerBlog.com is a popular blog worldwide for event professionals, covering topics such as event planning, social media and events, event technology, event trends, event inspiration but also destination management marketing and meeting planning.

Julius is the author of The Event App Bible and The Good Event Registration Guide, two ebooks showing the results of unprecedented research efforts about event mobile apps and event registration and ticketing providers. More than 15,000 readers have downloaded the ebooks in less than 6 months.   Julius also started the Event Planning and Event Management LinkedIn Group. A few years later, with more than 160,000 members a team of 12 moderators, it has become the de-facto largest gathering of event professionals online.
You can find more on a blog post at eventmanagerblog.com/social-media-mistakes
You can find Julius on his very popular Blog The Event Manager Blog. @EventMB
Twitter (http://twitter.com/tojulius) or at http://JuliusSolaris.com

Pat Ahaesy, CMP. CSEP
Pat’s company, P&V Enterprises is headquartered in New York City.
The website is www.pnventerprises.com. She has been a Certified Meeting Professional from the Convention Industry Council for more than 10 years, and has held the Certified Special Event Professional designation from the International Special Events Society for 10 years. She has 25 years of experience planning events and meetings, conferences trade shows, special events and all things meetings and events
 www.pnventerprises.com.
www.linkedin.com/in/patahaesy?
www.linkedin.com/company/pv-enterprises
https://www.facebook.com/pat.ahaesy?
https://www.facebook.com/PNVEnterprises
https://twitter.com/pnv123?
https://twitter.com/pnventerprises?
www.pinterest.com/pahaesy
https://plus.google.com/+PatriciaAhaesy?
https://plus.google.com/114064439521027434702?
pnventerprises.com/event-production-blog

Tim Holladay from Crowdmics.com – Crowd Mics turns the audiences iOS and Android devices into wireless microphones. Your audience can talk into their smartphones and tablets and be heard over the room’s sound system. Now your crowd can be heard clearly by everyone in the room, in real-time. Plus Crowd Mics includes a text comment feature and dead simple polling. And to demo it yourself, just download the free app, get some friends to do the same, connect to the same wifi and go for it. You can try it for free.
Crowdmics.com 
support@crowdmics.com,
call or text to 480-725-7255
Twitter @crowdmics.

Mikelis Studers  from Getctachbox.com
Catchbox is a professional wireless microphone that can be thrown around for Q&A at events and classrooms. The device communicates with a receiver that can be connected to any sound system. To avoid unwanted noises when being thrown around, internal electronics sense the motion of the cube and switch off the audio when it is caught, thrown,or dropped.
Website: getcatchbox.com
Email: info@getcatchbox.com
Twitter: @thecatchbox

Jon Trask
Founder at AVforPlanners.com.  You can find Jon at Jon(At)AVforPlanners.com
Jon has offered a free show evaluation to Meetings Planners and organizers for their next meeting. A $1500 value. All you have to do is email Jon and say you heard the offer on the podcast.  Jon has been a member of MPI since 1994, Jon earned his CMP designation in 2003. Jon has spent the last 20+ years in the audio visual and production business.
This experience, which cuts across so many different types of AV support while dealing in logistics, pre-production and project management, along with spending many years in sales give him a unique view of the disparate elements required to create a successful relationships, and ultimately to successfully support a meeting of any size. Jon was named “Meeting Professional of the Year” by the Orange County Chapter of MPI Jon keynote “Language of AV”  he has spoken to numerous meeting and events association and college classes at UCSD, OCC and CMP study groups on the subject of basic AV for planners.
@jontrask
Jon@avforplanners.com
AVforPlanners.com

If you like this podcast or you don’t please go into the iTunes store and write a review. 
www.MeetingsPodcast.com   Copyright © 2008-2014 by MeetingsPodcast.com

Mike:  Hello and welcome to this episode of the meetings podcast and my name is Mike McAllen and this is the podcast for meetings and event’s organizers who want to produce engaging programs for their attendees plus empower organizers with new tips and resources to take their careers to the next level, you can find links and transcripts on the Meetings Podcast website. I want to welcome the new listeners and if you have been listening you may have noticed we have shifted the podcast to be more of a magazine style, we have 20 or so great contributors who will be providing segments, tips and the resources for the revamped podcast and I hope you enjoy it. And if you do like what we are bringing you please do me a favor and head over to the iTunes store and leave a review it really helps us get more listeners. So on today’s show we have 3 sections, the first section we have our good friend Julius Solaris who is the editor of the Event Manager Blog and he is also the author of the event App Bible and the Good Registration Guide. Julius brings us another segment of hack your events, short cuts, tips and tricks to make your planning easier and today’s segment is called social media mistakes events make. The second segment we have Pat Agassi from P$V enterprises which is headquartered in New York City, her segment is do we really need a technical rehearsal? And I really love this segment because I like Pat we are adamant we make time to run through what is going to happen on the stage before we start the show and I think you will love this. And then for our main interview we have a little section I call Mike on Mics, I came across a group of innovative companies that are trying to help with the Q&A portion of events and they do a few other things it is kind of fine they are helping the Q&A to be more engaging and fun so we have Tim Holladay from the Crowd Mics and then we have Nicolas Studors from Catch Box and that is at Getcatchbox.com and of course crowdmics.com. And first of all we have Tim Holiday he is from Crow Mics and crowd Mics turns the audience IOS android mobile devices into wireless microphones kind of cool and then we will go right into Nicolas Studors section with catch box which is the world’s first throw able microphone, so let’s get right into it.
Julius:  Hi everyone, I am Julius and welcome back to the segment hack your event I hope you enjoyed the first episode about no shows at events, for our second episode I am going to talk about another very common topic for the modern event professionals which is social media and the use of social media at events. Now I see a lot of things that I am not necessarily fond of on social media and I wrote them all in a post I wrote plenty of them. I am going to give you sort of an overview and highlights about the most common mistakes that events professionals do on social media and most of all how to avoid it because it is just very super easy to point a finger at everyone else without an actual solution for it. So hopefully I am going to give you some tips to avoid and some ways to do better on social media because times are mature enough to shine on social, their kind of learning time is over it was over a few years ago already so customers expect us to be better at social and we can definitely be better at it. So some of the very common ones to me the origin of most of the mistakes on social media is actually not having someone dedicated to social media, one of the most recurring questions I would get when I always speak at events is why should we have someone dedicated to social other times mature enough to create roles to these people and there is a role to my post often at times they aren’t mature they are actually in fact rotten because we need to is you have people dedicated to social I mean you wouldn’t do catering yourself, why would you do social yourself if you don’t have a clue about how that works or if your job is doing something else coordinating people and teams like social media requires a very specific skills set that aren’t necessarily everyone has now in terms of sourcing these people that could be internal or external people but you need to have someone that is dedicated looking at not only how to market but also how to engage with people during the event or after the event, recognizing VIPs and influencers so that is super important. And also mistakes that we make on social actually are a result of not having someone dedicating and that is kind of struggling and then trying to do everything at once so make sure to hire someone, the fix is very easy you know being cheap isn’t necessarily good you wouldn’t be cheap with a lot of things when it comes to your events why would you want to be cheap with social media I mean it is becoming hygiene for a lot of us so take care of that. Another mistake that we make, it is begging I personally hate that whenever there is something like please re-tweet or someone directly mentioning someone else to ask for this and that now I believe we have to thank a very questionable research that was done about some social media pundit about tweets and about adding a please re-tweet stickmen in a tweet would actually increase the number of re-tweets that we have. First of all you have this approach to tweeter like counting how many re-tweets without contacts you have there is work that needs to be done there but I won’t get into that what I will get into is whenever you establish a relationship by means of following each other with someone else you really are creating the firm foundation for a long lasting relationship so if you spoil immediately asking for a like or re-tweet or whatever, it is going to have an impact and especially if you do it as soon as the relationship starts I believe that requires acceptable in social media and they can happen but they have to be very ponder-ate you have to think about what you are asking and it doesn’t have to be begging, you don’t have to look desperate there is call to action and there is begging very two different things, the difference here is creating value, how do you create value by asking something and think about what is in it for the other person on the other side. So the last one out of the 20, that I created is actually not replying, not acknowledging mentions on social media whatever they are I mean there are some people that actually only reply to positive ones disregarding completely the negative ones or some people actually don’t reply at all I think this is one of the most insulting thing you can do to your followers, prospective attendees or current attendees I mean if you picture that in real life like think about an attendee coming to an information desk and talking to someone asking where are the toilets and the person on the other side just doesn’t look at you in the face or isn’t answering at all that is really upsetting you wouldn’t do that in real life so why are you doing it on social media it is beyond my knowledge and understanding so drop this kind of attitude. There was a research that said that consumers on social media expect an answer within an hour from brands I believe that is the figure should be shorter for events so we really need to be there and respond to people as soon as possible, address positive, negative mentions alike if you aren’t sure about how to address negative mentions there is a full list of tools that I have created on the blog that you can go and search for whenever you on the post that is going to be linked on this section on the podcast in terms of social media tweet hash and how to deal with negativity and different types of negative comments as well. One of the most recurring issues that event professionals have and they tell me whenever they are embarking on social is what about if there is something negative? Well this should be a reason why this is something negative so first address the reason so that you will avoid some people think that something negative done on you always will have negativity coming at you, you can’t please everyone and anyone but the difference is how you respond to that and how you make an effort to create engagement and value for that. So that is it for my segment at hack your event I hope you enjoyed it, if you have any questions as always contact me on twitter @juliusatevent and I will be glad to answer that and I will see you at the next one.
Pat:  Do we really need that technical rehearsal? This is about why events technical rehearsals are vital. When we are producing or managing a meeting or event, we are very pushy about having technical rehearsals for general sessions awards events just about anything that has a speaker and an audience. We also ask for something that is done in the theatre and that is called blogging. So let’s start with blogging, for theatre productions during rehearsals there are blogging rehearsals to show the actress where they enter, where to walk, stand, sit, exit when they speak their lines, sounds smart doesn’t it? So when we are managing a corporate or association meeting or event we request the time for all speakers experienced or not to do this and do a technical rehearsal as well, we don’t generally have a luxury of time so this is somewhat condensed. The so called blogging is essential for awards, events, so the presenters know where to stand and how to present the award. Additionally often visual clues are given, the presenter knows the visual clue that introducer will give, this is a good idea as many times the presenter isn’t a professional speaker or presenter thus having those visual cues helps the person know when to either speak or to move and where to move too. Think about all those award shows that you see on television, you better believe that presenters and introducers rehearse, there is also always another person on stage close by to move the presenter where he/she needs to be and then to get the presenter and honoree off stage in a timely manner as well as guiding them to the correct exit. The other position can be a position of honor for younger or new members of the team, then we have the technical rehearsal especially in events and meetings where the speaker is speaking only once unlike in a theatre performance where he goes on every night you have just that one chance to get it right. Therefore the other critical component is technical, sound and lighting, media and in some cases teleprompting. So why is it so important? Let’s start with lighting, you do want to see the person I would suspect so the lighting folks have to be sure that A after you’ve done that blocking, know where the speaker will be entering, exiting and speaking, then of course we want to hear the person, being sure that the sound in the entire room is correct is key, your audio people will need to be aware of any speakers that speak too low or too loud for that matter so that the levels can be adjusted for a particular speaker. And media, be it sound, power point, video or pro should be gone through with a speaker, I think we all know why, let’s try to avoid those oops moments. Lastly the teleprompter, many speakers simply use no calls but others prefer teleprompter, the teleprompter gives the audience the feeling that the speaker is talking directly to them. The speaker must go through the entire speech of presentation with the teleprompter operator so the operator can get an idea of the speaker’s pace as well as having heard the speech. Sometimes the teleprompter operator will reformat the speech during this rehearsal so that it reads easily for that speaker. This way if the speaker decides to add lip and loud too the teleprompter won’t panic but wait for the speaker to return to the words on the prompter. Sometimes the speaker after add lipping will jump ahead thus the operator must jump ahead as well doing his best to find out where the speaker is. Having these rehearsals with experienced professional staff and an experienced stage director is key to a seamless stage performance and therefore a seamless and successful meeting or event.
Mike:  Today we have Tim Holladay from Crowd Mics, hi Tim?
Tim:  Hey, how is it going Mike?
Mike:  Hi, thank you very much for talking with me, why don’t you explain what Crow Mics is and how the idea came about?
Tim:  Crowd Mics is simply an app that turns IOS in android devices into wireless microphones for live events. So picture really any live event say conference you’ve got a presenter, you have 300 people in the crowd, crowd Mics lets the audience take out their devices, their phones or iPad, their tablets, talk into them and the voice is heard over the sound system, essentially we have got now 300 microphones in the room and there is no additional hardware being used it is really just the devices that everybody walks in with including the presenter it is a simple concept, it is one of those that should exist and we thought that we would be the ones to bring it. The pain point that we felt is that anybody feels that some of these events where the presenter is asking for a questions and comments from the crowd, wants some interactions and the crowd is willing so they raise their hands and you got some person running around with a wireless microphone trying to reach the person with the comment, sometimes the person is already half way through their comment but sometimes the Mic never gets there but the issue is the classic distraction of running the Mic around or having the Mics in the aisles which quite honestly really limits the number of people that comment. Shawn and I were sitting at a meeting so by the way Shawn and I we are brothers, we are sitting in the same meeting together sat by my side and he has always thrown that crazy idea we are in this particular meeting again lots of interaction and just a lot of particular openness with the situation where nobody can be heard, in this case about 150 people in the room and nobody we didn’t have any microphones and so basically it was hard to hear anybody except those at about 10 feet away. So at some point there was some lady making a comment kind of at the corner of the room and Shawn got distracted he couldn’t hear her, he pulled out his phone and I don’t know what he was looking at and he all of a sudden stood up and said hey wait, I could face time some guy, I could Skype some guy across the world and see and hear him no problem right now but I can’t hear that lady that is in the corner of the room that I can see, why can’t I use my phone as a wireless microphone and somehow magically be heard over the sound system here. My background is actually in live audio kind of for 10 years I did little small events, small corporate stuff and school stuff as far as running the audio so we kind of put our brains together and said let’s build this thing, we thought for sure it must exist and quite frankly when it comes to an app and app for mobile devices it doesn’t exist and so we actually just 2 weeks ago today launched Crowd Mics and now we are ready to roll.
Mike:  Very cool and so how did you guys get it built? Are you coders?
Tim:  I wish we were Mike, we aren’t so I mean we are definitely both tech guys have done a very high level coding but we did partner with a group called techery.io international they are a great company that we worked with to build this thing both for IOS and android.
Mike:  So what are some of the other benefits because I was going through the website and I was thinking you could poll in, what are kind of other things does it do?
Tim:  Besides the fact that you can talk into your phone and be heard over the sound system there is also two other features one is text commenting just like it sounds it is a one way text from the audience to the presenter, see the presenter always has to draw even with the Mics that was one of the questions we always get, men 200 live microphones in the room, that is a little scary isn’t it? And the reality is that the presenters always in control of who is speaking and when and that helps keep that under control in fact crowd Mics by design only allows one person to speak at a time from the audience, it kind of cuts that down but anyway it isn’t always appropriate to talk over the sound system, it isn’t always the right timing so text commenting is a quick easy way for the presenter to receive comments and questions by text. And then the 3rd feature is just a very simple polling feature, just a quick way to get a pulse on the crowd, the presenter or moderator can do a poll at any time. We are just trying to really nail those three down really well especially the microphones that is really one unique feature, there is a lot of apps to do polling, a lot of apps to do text commenting and other event apps to do other things we would love to integrate with those eventually but we are really focused on those microphones.
Mike:  You know I produce events as my business that is what we do so I am always thinking about that you know the lowest common denominator of that person who hardly knows how to use their cell phones, trying to do it so I think you kind of answered that by the presenter being able to shut them off and move on to somebody else. One of the other questions I had is like the volume so how does that work then?
Tim:  So as Shawn and I were discussing how to build this thing it is like okay so Shawn brought up the whole idea of magically being able to hear yourself on the sound system well there has to be some physics behind that math and what happens is the presenter themselves or the moderator actually just uses a device just like anybody else, an I phone or a Samsung whatever, they plug that into the sound system, that is the connection to the sound system just through the headphone jack, plug it in and so now they have an interface that lets them control who is speaking when and in addition to be able to control whether speaking or not they obviously can just use the microphone or they just mute the control volumes on their device to push it up and down as needed. The codec that we use actually has some built in feedback control, some built in echo control, we kind of built some stuff into it but you know you still need to kind of work at that a little bit. Now if you are in a situation where you have a sound guy running a sound board, he is going to have an input on his board that essentially is the entire crowd Mic, it is a Mic for the crowd it is the input that is plugged into your device and then he can help out with that as well, he could just ride it up and down as needed and here is the thing Mike I mean you are right you are getting on a point which is cool okay we get tutor Mics in the room that is great but many of them are different so you’ve got I Phones as a pretty standards, you’ve got Samsung S4s, there will be S5s, there will be tablets, for every different device there is a different microphone and they respond differently, they have different levels and so this is a little bit that is going on but again we try to correct for that and even that with our technology.
Mike:  So let’s say our planners were listening to this right now, what is the set up for that planner and you know if they are going to sell it to their boss and say hey you know I want to bring this in, what would the set-up be like and again I have to ask too the cost.
Tim: The set-up is actually really simple, the only thing that needs to be in place besides some kind of an audio connection plugging in to the sound system which quite frankly Mike doesn’t have to happen I mean think about the lowest tech solution you have a presenter standing up there looking at the microphone or a clip on the libel microphone on their shirt and they just don’t have accessibility to plug in into the sound system, they could hold their device to the microphone I mean the audio is coming out of their device either way from the crowd so that is the low tech solution but let’s assume they plug into the sound system the only other piece of magic as we have been saying that needs to happen is that they do only need to be connected to the same Wi-Fi network in the room, so I am going to throw something out there, it is slightly complicated though I will make it simple, crowd Mics runs off of the wireless router, it doesn’t run off the internet bandwidth and for those who might capture that when you talk, when you are in the audience Mic you are talking your voice doesn’t go out to a 3rd party server and then come back in, like we with Skype right now, it is going out to some server and then going to you, we keep it all within the local network so the Wi-Fi just needs to have a good router, that is all it is a decent router actually and that is important for meeting planners to understand at least on a high level because they don’t need to order a bunch of massive bandwidth because we are pushing a punch of audio around we aren’t, it just needs to connect to that router, that is it.
Mike:  So you recommend them buying or do you have that as part of the kit so to speak?
Tim:  yes, if they want to make sure that they are covered and they won’t have any issues they could go depending on the size of the crowd, they could just go buy a router off the shelve, again they don’t even need to plug it into the internet, they only need to plug a wire into the power and go for it. We don’t provide that necessarily as part of the service but we kind of recommend that and recommend some things you can do. Assuming you are in a controlled environment maybe you are in corporate offices or some sort of environment where you know you have good control over the Wi-Fi, the Wi-Fi is solid then you are good to go. The Wi-Fi quite frankly and quite honestly is our number one challenge making sure that it is sufficient, it is decent and we try to coach people and help them understand what they need but again it is very, very simple requirements when it comes to Wi-Fi. As far as the pricing goes we just want a lot of people using this, we just really want to get it out there and get people using, get people excited about crowd Mics so it is actually any planner can use it for free up to 20 people in a room just to try it out just a trial I guess in theory if you have that size of a crowd and you still feel like you want to use it, you use it for free we will help you to. Then we have a tier system so for example the next level is 50 participants and again 50 people that are connecting to the meeting that is $25 and then you go up 100, $50 and so on and so forth so it is essentially 50 cents a person now the cool thing is you have user crowd Mics if you are doing one off events you are actually using it for 30 days so get it a couple of weeks early, have it a couple of weeks after if you are planners just constantly doing meetings, constantly have events then go ahead and just sign up monthly and then we will just keep doing monthly and make it easy.
Mike:  It is like from the app store and the goggle store that is where you get it?
Tim:  Absolutely so you can download it for free from the Apple App store and the goggle place store and obviously it obviously fits the audience it is always free it is always a barrier to have the audience download another app we want to make it free so the planners downloads it for free, the audience downloads it for free, if the planner needs more than the 20 free people then they just need to go to crowdsmics.com and they can pay for it there and then they can just log into their device and their credits are applied.
Mike:  So you basically can have that on a slide as people walk in to the room?
Tim:  That is what I would exactly recommend or in emails leading up to the event you could just lobby it in there, here is links go down they will be up now, be ready and so on but I mean the reality is it is very simple and you essentially download the app takes about 60 seconds depending on the connection, launch it, put in the name and then you are done, you are in so it is pretty quick set up.
Mike:  And I guess you can do a combination to get people started, you could always run Mics to.
Tim:  You really could and in fact here is the hurdle we have Mike and this is why we appreciate the opportunity to be on the show here I mean there is a level of education, there is a level of trial I mean this is kind of an interesting concept, it is intriguing for many people the response we’ve had has been really encouraging and exciting but it is still kind of like hey wait though, I have got to give up those wireless Mics what if it doesn’t work, what if this happens, what if the people can’t download it? We want people to try it so they might run a parallel that is why we try to make some free versions of it which we have to make it very inexpensive. You know you’ve done a bunch of these meetings I mean what does a wireless Mic rough cost? $100, $150 depending you know for $150 we are giving out 300 Mics so we hope that the cost is such that it is worth a try.
Mike:  It sounds great, it sounds really great and we will see if we can get it rolling and it is something worth doing. It is kind of cool that to be able to pitch it and have something new because it is fun to have new, I mean we are always looking for engaging stuff for our attendees to be you know something cool is always nice instead of the debt by power point all the time. But that comes to the 3 tips you are going to give about engaging audiences.
Tim:  That is right and keep in mind we are tech guys we have loved to dive into this world over the last year we aren’t event professionals like yourself and your listeners and so these tips are strictly coming from a couple of guys who have observed some things about meetings and this is kind of our thoughts. One of the tips is to find ways to engage the audience, there is a school of thought out there that if they have their devices in their hands they aren’t listening to me they are just they are going to have them in their hands, they are having it on their wrists now I have a pebble watch I am looking at right now I am getting buzzed my text on my wrist you know people wear goggle glass I mean it is coming and so instead of fighting I hope that we as meetings professionals can find ways to use the devices to engage but also to just make our meetings and presentations engaging you know get the head up and looking and so on and so there are different ways to do that. The next one is to care about the Wi-Fi the prices for Wi-Fi in some venues is absolutely it should be illegal I mean it is unreal and it surprises us constantly I mean you got to be joking that said and forget the pricing we will talk about that later but it really is important for the attendees they feel like there is blanket of security when they have the Wi-Fi available to them and that also help with the engagement with these devices and apps. The 3rd tip is let the audience be heard, obviously this is going to sound like a little bit self-serving and I thought just that but really though at the end of the day we have found that the audience truly can be and should be important and actually critical part of the presentation meaning the insights and the thoughts that come from the audience and the questions can actually turn their discussion into a really important engaging and educational situation that they need to be physically heard, there is nothing more annoying than being just out of ear shot, just not quite able to hear and if you have a really good presenter who repeats the question even if they repeat it word for word it is just not quite the same, you don’t get quite the same dynamic as hearing it from that person’s mouth so we love it when people try to let the audience be heard. Now obviously crowd Mics that is a massive shameless plug we think that it is a great way for people to be heard you know what quite honestly I would actually rather see people run wireless microphones around the room than nothing, I really would I honestly would because when you can hear you can relax and enjoy and understand when you can’t hear you strain, you get frustrated and it just creates some tension that just simply doesn’t need to be there so let the audience be heard.
Mike:  I agree and I think that is one of the biggest thing as a collaboration they say on a study show when they audience is collaborating they get way more out of it than listen to somebody who is talking to them. Well Tim, tell me where people can find crowd Mics, where they can find you if they want to ask more questions and all the places they can find you.
Tim:  You can always grab us on crowdmics.com we actually have a live chat you can chat us that comes right to our phones and there is no way we can escape, you can get me directly, tim@crowdmics.com we would love your questions, your feedbacks, your comments, twitter you’ve got timholladay, @schawnholladay as well, crowdmics on twitter as well we try to be available just about anywhere, face book, goggle plus, you name it we are there ready to answer questions and get people just trying playing with, giving us feedback on crowd Mics.
Mike:  Alright, great thanks so much Tim and I hope everything goes well I mean much success.
Tim:  Thanks Mike we really appreciate it, thank you.
Mike: Welcome to Nicolas Studors from Catch Box, Hi Nicolas?
Nicolas:  Hi Mike!
Mike:  How are you doing today or how is your evening?
Nicolas:  It has been great, thanks all going well like working though it is like pretty late night here.
Mike:   That is good, means things are happening so that is good. So can you explain what Catch Box is and where the idea came from?
Nicolas:  Right catch box is a very simple product it is a throw able microphone two simple words and to open it up a bit it is a wireless microphone that has a soft outer cover and which makes it very easy to pass it around in the audience. So in situations right there like questions and answers or a discussion type of set up in the event you can use this simple tool to give turns to speakers, or I call people just like have questions and answers running. So like you’ve seen the product it is a huge shaped colorful piece that can be passed around the audience and then on a technology side wirelessly connects to a receiving unit that gives the sound out.
Mike:  And how did it come about?
Nicolas:  It came about in our university set up we started off in Alta university in Finland and we are kind of classifying university start up but that was a long time ago but now we are like established company and so like the context was the university in where we saw the seminars and questions and answers being held on regular basis and whenever there was microphone in use it was used very slowly and it kind of broke and went down the flow was kind of like going down at that moment wherever the audience especially right to choose so we thought hey there has to be a better way to do this and step by step we started to develop this idea within our team of course like building it around the product itself in the first place and that is how the idea and the business came about.
Mike:  And so you said it is a microphone and it is wireless so what do you actually get in the box when you get a catch box?
Nicolas:  Currently we are in the pre order stage so we are very actively developing the product and it is coming out in June and the product itself will be so what you get in the box is the actual U-shaped soft thing, it is in the size of let’s say it is roughly 20 centimeters which I think is 9 inches I guess and 7×7 inch cube and you get that plus a receiving unit so that wireless connects between that and all the necessary cables and accessories plus the product that basically makes it plug and play solution.
Mike:  So where would you use the catch box, where do you envision people use it?
Nicolas:  We have been testing the catch box in the past 1 ½ years the company has been up and running in various places and set ups it is the best in questions and answers, panels, discussions type of events and the set-ups where the audience needs to be involved so this is where a catch box works really the best and also that is one thing like organized events but the other angle to it definitely is also companies and their inner meetings so when we look at these sectors there definitely is events, there is company internal communication, and there is education so lectures, class rooms, teaching events and training workshops.
Mike:  Can you use more than one at a time or is it just one usually?
Nicolas:  Yes you can use up to, actually there is almost no limitation to how many you can use it more depends on what the audience size is preferably like how many you have and how fast can you like get it from one side of the audience to the other one so like starting from say 300-400 people there could be used 2. But I guess you meant something about technology side of this so like the current product that is a real borne theatre on our website there can be 4 catch boxes used at the same time and that is due to the radio wave spectrum usage, the spectrum is full so to say. But we also are offering a product that has a different wireless technology use inside and currently it is available for rent in our website and that has no limitations to use it uses different frequencies and that is why it can be used as many as you can. So there is a little bit of angle of this technology side it is used inside a product however from outside it is the same colorful soft box.
Mike:  So that is pretty interesting because I was looking at your website about Skype calls because then you could actually see who is talking with the color of it and I thought that was a great idea.
Nicolas:  Right, actually you are right we have this use case section in our website and that is what actually naturally found its ways to be used and Skype calls is great, you can imagine this grainy pixilated picture where you barely can see the people and then you definitely can see this flying node colorful hue and see who and when they are speaking into it.
Mike:  So is it really thrown or people pass in it, I could just see somebody getting bugged to the head but again it is soft so if that happens?
Nicolas:  It is thrown and people love to throw it, that is exactly how it is of course you need to use the common sense when you do it is very light so there is no danger if you throw it normally to a person and the person receiving it is prepared to catch so yes people do throw it but it can also be passed around in case there is let’s say food or drinks involved yes you can pass just as a normal Mic.
Mike:  And how do you get not having sounds because when you it like you throw a microphone wouldn’t it go bong, bong, like how does that work?
Nicolas:  Excellent question, this is what our technology is based on or the product is made of, the sound is automatically turned off when the microphone is in the air so we have sensors inside an algorithm that turns it off wherever the microphone is in the air and slightly after that. So whenever there is a possibility to this bog box sounds they actually never reach the loud speakers so it is always off at those moments and on when you actually are talking into it.
Mike:  And so how would somebody pitch this to their boss? Like if a meeting planner is listening to us right now, how do they pitch this to their boss, what is the way they could pitch it to their boss?
Nicolas:  I think definitely is this opportunity to solidify their wealth, let’s say it definitely is a great tool to really engage with your audience because whenever catch box is in the room so many people will just want to touch it and subsequently they want to talk and they want to speak up so it is actually a tool for event planner, organizer or moderator to get closer to your audience to engage with them so you can actually get something out from your audience if that is your intention so it makes you so much more easier about that.
Mike:  Very cool, so where can they get a catch box and where can they get a hold of you?
Nicolas:  You can always go to our website which is; getcatchbox.com and all the information about the product and the pre-order and pricing and delivery is there they are currently shipping in June this year 2014 that is where we have promised people to get their catch boxes and all the contact information is obviously there, you can contact us directly and also placing the order basically now as this is the first batch that we are shipping to people we have promised 500 pieces of the catch box being customizable so as the outer cover is soft and actually is made of fabric we can print on it and we are able to offer free customization for those 500. So it means that you can print your company name, your twitter handle, any text information at this point and that is free of charge for this first unit.
Mike:  Wauh, so this is very cool and I think people also when there is a great little because it is kind of a great little thing to say to this audio podcast doesn’t do it justice but there is a great video on the front of the getcatchbox.com page that I would say people should go check out because it is really cool and thank you so much for talking with me.
Nicolas:  Yeah thanks Mike, thanks for having the opportunity to be here.
Mike:  Yeah and good luck with everything it seems like a really cool fun idea and I hope to talk to you soon.
Nicolas:  Okay thanks Mike.
Mike:  Okay I want to thank first of all I want to thank Julius Solaris for mistakes on social media by event managers and marketers, the plunders that he gave us were pretty good he has an accompanying blog post at eventmanagerblog.com/socialmediamistakes which you can find on his really popular blog, you can follow him on twitter @eventmb or 2julius, you could also find him on the Julius Solaris Website Juliussolaris.com and I wanted to thank also Pat Agassi, she has been at CMB, from the CIC for more than 10 years she has held the Certified Special Event Professional designation from the International Special Events Society for 10 years, she has 25 years of experience of planning events and meetings and conferences and trade shows and special events and all kinds of stuff, she surely knows her stuff and so I feel really lucky to have her involved with the podcast her company website is pnventerprises.com, you can find Pat and her company all over the place in social media, twitter, Pinterest, face book, Linked In and Google Plus and of course on her blog she has a great twitter name which is really easy to remember so go right now and go in and say hallo to her, she is @pnv123 on twitter, so you can always find all the stuff hopefully on the ID3 tags on the mobile device right there on your hand right now or you can go to the meetings podcast website on Mike Grass shack Production Company website. And I want to thank the Mike on Mics guests, I want to thank Tim Holladay from crowd Mics, you just heard that it changes the questionnaires for Mics at events with your mobile device; cool also you can find them at crowdmics.com, support@crowdmics.com. You can call or text to 480-725-7255 or at twitter @crowdmics. They are really great guys as you know you just heard Tim go ahead give him a call if you have any questions, also Nicolas Studors from getcatchbox.com thank you so much for being on the show and you can get them at getcatchbox.com, you can also find them at twitter @thecatchbox, you can always email them at info@getcatchbox.com, I also want to thank Imax America our sponsor for the 3rd straight year, take a look at the Imax America website and I hope to see you down there because we really had a great time last year Jon and I we had AV for planners booth and it was really fun, you can find me Mike McAllen at my meetings and video production company Grass Shack Events $ Media or at AV for Planners with my partner Jon Trask and by the way Jon is still offering up a free summary evaluation of events meeting or conference AV to all meetings podcast listeners it is a $1,500 value and actually you can just email Jon@avforplanners.com and tell him you heard him on the show and he will get you one credit which is for one evaluation of 3 companies so that can be an in house company and two outside companies but this promotion is now a limited offer so it will run to the end of April. It is really great to get evaluation of your audio visuals done even if you have a national account it was pretty cool you have some pretty cool case studies of how it really works for everybody that AV Company and you because you do it for your venues and your menus so you might as well do your due diligence by easily negotiating with them on labor and AV. So I have to say also of course as you know I am an investor in the company so take my recommendation but please try it out if you have a moment and I would love to hear any comments on the service if you can give me some feedback on what we can do to make it better we will do it. Also speaking of comments we had last week’s podcast really some hackles with the CMM controversy that is going on with MPI if you haven’t heard it go back in and give it a listen I am glad we got the conversation going a little bit more about it because it is really the people with the CMMs are kind of up in arms and it is kind of a hot button right now so go take a listen to that if you want. And if you enjoy listening to the Meetings Podcast consider subscribing right now on ITunes or Stitcher radio app and leave us a review and right now if you turn and take that mobile phone in your hand and take an Instagram selfie picture of yourself I would love to see it while you are listening to the show and that would be really cool if you then post that on Instagram and put the hash tag meetings podcast. So of course if you have any questions or comments please send them to me at meetingspodcast(at) gmail.com or call me on my cell phone I have it almost always though it doesn’t work that well on the Meetings Podcast studio I would love to talk to you. So I hope you enjoyed the show and I will see you next week.

 

285 Meetings Podcast New CMM Requirements, Content Creation, Social Media Superstars

Where are you listening? Take a picture of yourself (selfie) with hashtag #meetingspodcast on Instagram and we will use it as the image art for the podcast page.

cmm 300x215 285 Meetings Podcast New CMM Requirements, Content Creation, Social Media Superstars

Where are you listening? Take a picture of yourself (selfie) and #meetingspodcast on Instagram
Thanks for listening to the Meetings Podcast.  The Meetings Podcast is sponsored by IMEX America and AVforPlanners.com

 
Todays Segments:

1- Liz King of Liz King Events speaks to Eventsagrams AJ Poletta about the getting the right kind of social media photos and video sharing at your events.  Great user generated content is being produced at all events.  Eventstagr.am collects images and shares them easily for your attendees and to help event planners brand their events correctly.  Some best practices are shared.
www.lizkingevents.com
www.techsytalk.com
@lizkingevents
www.eventstagr.am

2- Editor Barbara Scofidio and Sue Pelletier from MeetingsNet’s talk about the Top 10 Social Media Influencers
Sue shares how she uses social media to network and some tips on the ins and outs.  The MeetingsNet editors and Twitter followers have also spoken: The latest version of the MeetingsNet app magazine features our picks for the top 10 social media influencers in the meetings industry today. Editor Barbara Scofidio, the mastermind behind the story, talks about some of the highlights, and chats with MeetingsNet’s own social media influencer, editor Sue Pelletier.
Main site: MeetingsNet.com
Download our fabulous new app: http://meetingsnet.com/app-faq
Or download for tablets today from your App Store, Google Play, or Amazon Marketplace.
Twitter handles: @spelletier MeetingsNet’s  @meetingsnet @barbarascofidio bscofidio@meetingsnet.com

3- Jon Trask and Elizabeth Glau talk about last December Meeting Professionals International (MPI) created a venture with the Global Business Travel Association (GBTA) to revise MPI’s CMM Program and in the process establish a new set of standards.  These changes didn’t resonate well within the existing CMM community who have responded with a petition asking some of the changes be modified or even abandoned.  Today the podcast takes a look at this controversy with Jon Trask of AVforPlanners and Elizabeth Glau of Building Blocks Social Media discussing some of the pros and cons of the proposed changes.

Segment Producers this week (In order of appearance)
Mike McAllen
Liz King
Barbara Scofido
Sue Pelletier
Jon Trask
Elizabeth Glau

Mike McAllen
Mike brings his hundreds of proven worldwide resources to the fresh, creative, fast paced boutique environment that his meetings and video production company Grass Shack Events & Media has established.  Mike has an eclectic background which leads him to the communications world. Several years of firefighting instilled a hearty work ethic and the importance of teamwork to get a job done right and the love of helping people.
Mike is also the founder of three other products EventCamp.org, AVforPlanners.com, MeetingsPodcast.com all help the meetings and events industries learn about event technology and social media in events and meetings.
Mike’s list of repeat clients for the past ten years at Grass Shack Events & Media includes Oracle, MySQL, Blackboard, Hilton Hotels, Hewlett Packard, Yahoo, Wells Fargo, Siemens Medical Solutions, PepsiCo, Genzyme, Sanofi, BiogenIdec, Thompson Reuters, Vantagescore,  GAP, Restoration Hardware among many more.
@mmcallen
GrassShackRoad.com
AVforPlanners.com
www.linkedin.com/in/mikemcallen

Liz King
Liz is an event planning superhero by day, and closeted tech geek and introvert by night. Distraught by the thought of everyday civilians being conquered by spreadsheets, she resolved to re-channel her organizational and tech savvy superpowers and launched Liz King Events while still running events full time for Columbia University. Liz voraciously shared content on event best practices via social media and quickly became a thought leader/influencer amongst her peers. Her hopes of being an incognito event superhero went down the drain as her cover was blown once she started making cameos on lits like ‘Successful Meetings list of 25 Most Influential People in the Meetings Industry” and ‘Connect Magazine’s list of 40 Under 40 Up-and-Coming Event Planners in 2011″. Liz now comfortably wears her cape and employs her superpowers to helps entrepreneurs/brands like Claudia Chan and Ramit Sethi plan smart, tech-savvy events to better engage their attendees. ??Outside of client events, Liz uses her prowess to educate and challenge her industry peers on how to better integrate technology into live events to create a more winsome audience experience, through auxiliary outlets techsytalk.com and PlannerTech [Founder]. When not saving gotham from the event planning woes, Liz can be found unwinding by learning how to code, brushing up on her Korean, or indulging in Korean cuisine … all in civilian geek attire, of course.

LINKS:
www.lizkingevents.com
www.techsytalk.com
@lizkingevents

Barbara Scofidio
Barbara joined Corporate Meetings & Incentives in 1991 and has served as its editor since 1994. She is an active member in many meeting and incentive industry associations, and was the first member of the media ever to serve on a Global Business Travel Association committee. In addition to her role on GBTA’s Groups and Meetings Committee from 2008-2011, she served on the education committee for the 2007 SITE International Conference, has judged the SITE Crystal Awards for the past 10 years, and led the media committee for SITE’s 35th Birthday Celebration at the 2008 Motivation Show. A frequent speaker and panelist at industry events, Barbara is a past winner of journalism awards from SITE, ASBPE, and Folio.  Twitter handle: @barbarascofidio bscofidio@meetingsnet.com

Sue Pelletier
Sue is one of the MeetingsNet editors, has been writing and editing business publications
for more than 20 years. She also develops and manages Internet sites, enjoys growing social networking communities, and helps plan live events and webinars. Since starting covering this industry, she has developed a huge interest in adult education in all its many facets, and a fascination with how all the elements come together to create a learning environment that actually gives people the tools they need to do their jobs better once they get home. ?e-mail: spelletier@meetingsnet.com?Twitter: http://twitter.com/spelletier? Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/sue.pelletier

Jon Trask
Co founder at AVforPlanners.com.  You can find Jon at Jon(At)AVforPlanners.com
Jon has offer a free show evaluation to Meetings Planners and organizers for their next meeting. A $1500 value. All you have to do is email Jon and say you heard the offer on the podcast.  Jon has been a member of MPI since 1994, Jon earned his CMP designation in 2003. Jon has spent the last 20+ years in the audio visual and production business.
This experience, which cuts across so many different types of AV support while dealing in logistics, pre-production and project management, along with spending many years in sales give him a unique view of the disparate elements required to create a successful relationships, and ultimately to successfully support a meeting of any size. Jon was named “Meeting Professional of the Year” by the Orange County Chapter of MPI Jon keynote “Language of AV”  he has spoken to numerous meeting and events association and college classes at UCSD, OCC and CMP study groups on the subject of basic AV for planners.
@jontrask
Jon@avforplanners.com
AVforPlanners.com

Elizabeth Glau and
Elizabeth Glau, CMP launched Building Blocks Social Media in 2009. With a thorough knowledge of key social platforms and understanding of content flow within these networks, Elizabeth’s thirst for “What’s Next” keeps her on the cutting edge of the tools and tactics in interactive media. Elizabeth has helped to increase the proficiency of the meetings and events industry by consulting and speaking on topics such as personal branding, engagement technology and event marketing.

http://www.elizabethglau.com/

@elizabethglau   http://www.socialmediaforplanners.com/  http://www.socialpointforevents.com/

If you like this podcast or you don’t please go into the iTunes store and write a review.
www.MeetingsPodcast.com   Copyright © 2008-2014 by MeetingsPodcast.com

The Meeting Planners podcast source for what’s new and exciting in meetings and events industry.

Transcripts!

Mike:  Hello and welcome to this episode of the Meetings Podcast my name is Mike McAllen and this is the podcast for meetings and event’s organizers who want to produce engaging programs for their attendees plus empower our organizers with new tips and resources to take their careers to the next level, you can find links and transcripts on the meetings podcast website. So you may have noticed again we have switched and shifted the podcast to be more of a magazine style, we still have the main interview but we have 20 or so great contributors who will be bringing new segments for their events podcast and I hope you enjoy it. If you do enjoy it I really appreciate if you went over to the iTunes store and you can find the link on our site and leave a review, it really helps us to get more listeners. And so on today’s show we have 3 sections; the first section is Liz King from Liz King events talking to AJ Palter of Instagram, he is at the UK and now they have a New York office. They talk about getting attendees to share the right content at events about branding, and hash tags and a lot of good stuff it is a really great segment so I think you should look forward to that. The next segment has Sue Pelletier and Barbra Scofidio, they are from Meetings Net and they are going to be talking about the Meetings Net Editors and the Twitter followers have spoken the latest version of the Meetings Net App Magazine features their picks for the top 10 social media influencers in the meetings industry today. Editor Barbra Scofidio the master mind behind the story talks about some of the highlights and chats with Meetings Net own social media influencer, Editor, Sue Pelletier and that is really fun they talk about all these people that are most of them you know if you are on twitter or face book you will know these names and they are really people that get out there and get their content out there. As for the main interview we have Jon Trask of AV for Planners and Elizabeth Glau of Social Media Building Blocks talking about last December’s Meeting Professions International, they created a venture with the Global Business Travel Association to revise MPIs CMM program in the process established a new set of standards. These changes didn’t resonate well with the existing CMM community who have responded with a petition asking of the changes be modified or even abandoned. Today they will be talking about that controversy and they will discuss some of the pros and cons of the proposed changes.
Liz:  Hi everyone thanks for having me this is Liz King with Liz King events and it is such a pleasure to be here. 2013 was dubbed as the year of the selfie and it is certainly evident in our events, more than ever our attendees are interested in taking photos and videos at our events and this is something that event planners really have to get used to. How do we encourage the right kind of sharing? How do we collect this information and how do we use it to our branding benefit? There are a lot of questions here so I thought it would be good to introduce you to a company that is helping event planners collect more of these images and leverage them for our events. And we are also going to talk today a little bit about how we can encourage great user generated content of our events and what are best practices are for collecting everything that happens live as the event is happening. Today I am really pleased to introduce you to AJ Palter he is the head of US Cross at a company called Eventstagram, they are based out of the UK and they have just recently opened an office here in New York as well.
AJ:  Thank you so much for having this on all the way over from the UK Eventstagram is a fun engagement technology that allows us to aggregate content in real time at an event from Eventstagram, twitter and we are able to capture photos that people are posting whether it is a wedding or music festival, conference or a meeting and we are able to display all that content as a part of it, interactive slide show encourages people to share through social media and share using a hash tag that you are able to use and hash tag at a later date.
Liz:  That is great I think that picture and video sharing has become so popular so it is really important to get planners the tools that they need to collect all that and share it at an event and I recently attended a fashion show that you guys were sponsoring and I got to see Eventstagram in action and it is always funny when people take a picture and they tweet it and then it comes up on the big screen and then they take a picture of that picture it is becoming more viral they are sharing it because they have seen it publicly and that helps to feed into it. But a lot of planners are really trying to understand how this all works, how do you get people to take pictures in the first place, how do you get them to share in a way that you can then collect it, what kind of tips do you have for planners who are just getting started over things like that?
AJ:  I think that one of the key steps some of us in the industry sort of overlook is the fact that we really need to sensitize the hash tag not clear to a lot of the individuals who may be interested or focused in the social media space they might be sharing content but the content is lost if it isn’t shared in a way that you can aggregate and use. So I think that that is one of the key pieces of Eventstagram is that we are able to say, hey listen we are going to sort of reward you for sharing using the hash tag you can even get to see your photos, your content up on the big screen in real time whereas otherwise a lot of people aren’t inclined to share using that hash tag just because it doesn’t particularly concern them perhaps or maybe they are just not familiar with the process but by having a clear call to action at that, by using that hash tag you are going to be a part of the event and we are going to recognize that at real time I think that that is a clear call to action for people to do so.
Liz:  And I think there is something to branding your event and I always talk about creating picture perfect moments like giving people something to take a picture of. People taking pictures, your brand is being shared through those pictures I have often seen speakers that are set up on a big huge stage and people are taking tones of pictures of them but they have no backdrop behind them with any brand on it so you might be getting all those pictures but you aren’t getting the branding out of all that effort and then if people share on the hash tag you can benefit but that is only one piece of the branding cargo.
AJ:  I think that is a great point too because that is one of the key hurdles with social media it is the fact that the platforms today don’t seem to be particularly interested in sort of tying in branded photos as an offering which is thus quite frustrating to event planners so if you can create those situations whether it is on a step on a key or some sort of installation that really inspires people to capture those moments, that is huge in getting your brand and your product placement out into the social media space just because there is no filter for your brand as much as you would love there to be.
Liz:  Now, I know that any event technology company is innovating all the time you have a great product but I am sure there are a lot of things that you are working on that maybe aren’t released yet or are new features. So can you tell our listeners what are some of the things we are looking for in the future of Eventstagram?
AJ:  So we are constantly working on ideas all the time and you know about maybe only 30% of those ever make it to you guys because we test and try things 24 hours a day, trying to constantly improve the products I think one of the things that is really exciting for me as we work both in sort of the small events space and also with the corporate brand activations is that as we build these amazing displays for some of the big events, some of the big brands is we are actually working to take those templates, pick those animations and capture the mesmerizing displays that we are building for the big events and we are breaking that down into templates that people can use on Eventstagram at their own smaller events. So I think it is kind of cool proposition to say hey you can have the display that for our use when they were releasing their 458 special car in Aston and we are breaking that down for you and now you can have that ideal meeting, ideal conference which I think is something that has a little posses to what the people like.
Liz:  Awesome, now since we are talking technology I have to ask you I am always working to create mobile app or event tech product, what are some of your favorite that you think we should all be investigating?
AJ:  We are constantly trying to uncover new events tech as well a lot of it we get from Liz King events but we occasionally find some other channels as well, there are a couple of things that kind of come to mind here, one of the companies, I think they are based in Europe but they just came over to the States like us as well and they are called Emergency Digital they are planning an event just next week and we are really excited because from what I can gather they provide every attendee with an I Pad but I don’t think you’ve got to keep that, they provide you with an I Pad as you walk in and then have a sort of interactive platform that encourages people to engage through ice breakers or through team building exercises and I think as far as is concerned it is kind of you need to talk to some other people in the room and get as much information from them in order to proceed and then they have software, they have 50 I pads in the room and they will send out like a puzzle to each I Pad and each I Pad turns into a piece of the puzzle and then everyone in the room has to work as a team to mount these I Pads unto these bracketing on the wall in order to create this puzzle in real time. That was a pretty cool use of tech and I am excited to see what these guys can do in the future. And then the other one that I am really excited about is, have you heard anything on the use of drones for aerial photography at events?
Liz:  I have seen it for sports but not necessarily for events.
AJ:  Yeah, so I was reading in just few weeks ago there is a company based out in Orlando Florida called Sonus Studios and they started what it seems as renting out these drones they will have a pilot basically come and provide aerial coverage of your event, I think it is something like $500 for 3 hours but after playing with the drone that I got for Christmas back in December, just a little guy would have a camera on it and I was around cruising around my neighborhood taking photos from 50 feet in the air, I think that is something that could be really cool is sort of a real time aerial coverage of your event, I think that is something that is going to continue to grow we just have to see what the FAA thinks about all the flying drones around our conferences and our festivals.
Liz:  Yes, drones are a hot topic these days. Thank you so much for sharing with us today, it was great chatting with you about event technology and I will encourage all of our listeners to check you on your website and follow you on twitter and check out your blog I am really interested to see what you are going to be doing at south by south west.
AJ:  Yeah that sounds amazing, thanks so much for having us on and we are excited to help everyone engage their audiences at their events and we will check back in often.
Barbra:  Hallo everyone, this is Barbra Scofidio, I am an editor with Meetings Net and I am here with Sue Pelletier another of our editors to talk about the February cover story of our new I Pad tablet app and it is on industries top social media influencers, welcome Sue.
Sue:  Hi.
Barbra:  Sue is one of our influencers and this was a group that we chose all of our editors got together and brainstormed and we reached out to the industry and asked too the people who are most influential on twitter who you look for their blogs and you want to hear about, you want to get to know the person behind the hash tag or behind the twitter handle. And came about with just a great list, learnt so much about what their strategies are behind their tweeting, they aren’t blindly tweeting they are very much building brand but they are also being themselves and I think that is an important first point to touch on Sue. Did you notice that as well that one of the most important characteristics or common characteristics is authenticity when it comes to being an influencer?
Sue:  Absolutely, I think one of the influencers said, I think the question was like people surprised when they meet you in real life they were like no I am pretty much exactly who I am on twitter, on my blog or whatever and I think that is a key part of social media is to be who you are not to try and put on some persona, try and be somebody you aren’t they are going to someday meet you in real life and figure out who you are anyway so you might as well be authentic about it. But everybody seemed to think that that was a very key piece of their social media strategy if you want to call it that but you should just really get out there and be who you are and share what you have with the world and what you know and to get the same back from other people.
Barbra:  Exactly, another thing that I noticed that I was a little surprised about is a lot of these influencers don’t necessarily choose a time to tweet; they are spontaneous, much more spontaneous than I thought but there are some great tools out there as well that you can use to time your tweets, can you talk a little bit about that?
Sue:  Sure I am a big fan of who tweet, I think that is a wonderful program where you can pre-schedule your tweets or your post to LinkedIn or face book or wherever you want to post things to. It is really handy for me in particular because I tend to go through all my RSS Feeds at night while watching TV and kind of figure out what is going on and what I want to be posting about the next day and then I can just auto schedule things to go out so when I am in the middle of a crisis at work I can actually take care of that and not be like I have to go tweet now. I think a lot of people do that it is just a really handy scheduling tool and you can also set up different feeds to follow, people who you really want to pay attention to out of the fire horse of information coming at you there is really those few key people that you want to listen to, your own personal influencers and there are ways that you can sort of cut through the noise by using that tool as well. There are plenty of others out there but who tweet is my personal favorite and it has been for quite a while now.
Barbra:  Right that is what came up the most, another interesting fact that we discussed was connecting the tweets with blogs and then kind of secure this connections that each form of social media creates and you certainly have an award winning blog, you want to talk a little bit about that and how you do social with your blog and vice versa?
Sue:  Sure, I think that is why I got in on this prestigious list it is just I got the longevity award I have been blogging since I believe it was 2002 when I first started the face to face blog for meetings net and it was a whole different universe back then than it is now, not many fewer people around and they were a bit, it is just in such a tremendous way to meet people who you would never meet otherwise and now when you start layering in all the other social media that has come since then it is really kind of interesting how it all works together and how you can really take something that is interesting to talk about and you can blend it down to 140 characters for twitter, you can make it much more personal and friendly for face book, you can make it much more businesslike for LinkedIn, each of the social media has its own kind of persona and it is kind of interesting to weigh and everyone does try to really make their message meet what people are looking for in that particular social network.
Barbra:  Very true and it is also interesting there is a time and a place you get a little bit personal, most of the people occasionally would tweet about something more personal, having to do with their travels or even their families but it is few and far between and it is a little different for each person but I did notice that our top social influencer is someone that the world knows and follows and that was Richard Branson and you talk about a guy whose personality into his social media it is him and he actually does his tweeting, he has a person who we have spoken with who tweets for him but he does a lot of it on his own, he is always thinking about a  little bit of that joke factor and how to surprise people next and he shares some of his personality and some of his personal details in his tweets, he is a bit of a rock star so everybody wants to hear about it but there is kind of a time and place and everyone we spoke with said that occasionally they will talk about something funny that just happened or what one of their kid said or something like that. Do you do that as well?
Sue: I do, I have been known to post pictures of my dog to the blog I know you aren’t supposed to do that but you know whatever she is cute but yeah I mean it is part of getting to know who the person behind the technology and you know we are people and we do have kids and families and lives and trouble woes and everything else that goes along with it, it is important not to flood people with that kind of information especially if you are doing it primarily for your business so you don’t want to be too personal but it just adds a little, you know who you are talking to a little bit more and even in tweeter it is kind of funny how much personality can come through in those little tidy bits of information but you really get a flavor of who that person is just by how they phrase things and then you learn a little bit more about their personal life and I think that is a great idea, I don’t think that is a great idea for the people to tweet what they had for lunch and show pictures of that, I don’t think that is a little gratuitous but every now and then if it is a particularly beautiful lunch, why not.
Barbra:  Why not and it is funny but that is also why it is so easy when you have been tweeting to go to an industry meeting and tweet out that you are going to be there and it is almost like you have a bunch of fast friends pretty much everybody we interviewed spoke about that how they are connected before they even get to an industry meeting, I think it is great if the industry meeting has a tweet up to attend the tweet up we just did that at PCMA and it was a lot of fun and you have more connections when you leave that you continue to follow and they follow you I am sure you are doing that at every meeting you go to.
Sue:  Of course and you know social media is like we all keep saying all this is virtual interaction just drives face to face and it is so true and you can go to any industry meeting, tweet up and you will see hugging and ooh that is what you are like in real life, ooh I am so glad to meet you I mean it is kind of like holding home for people who haven’t met each other in a lot of cases, it is really interesting and I would highly recommend anybody who either is new to it or is thinking about getting involved in doing some social networking for their business to go too to some of these industry meet ups at MPI or PCMA and just meet some of the other people who are doing it and even if you are new to it everybody is very friendly and more than happy to show you the ropes on how to get started with it and you will meet instant friends that way and it is just an amazing experience.
Barbra:  And also take a look at our brand new tabloid app you download it through the apple store you can download it through Google Play or Amazon market place, just type in meetings net that is our brand new App we have got a great cover story there about the ten top social media influencers I think you will find it is a lot of fun.
Jon:  Welcome back to the podcast this is Jon Trask from AV for Planners and I am here with Elizabeth Glau of building blocks social media.
Elizabeth:  Thank you for having me again.
Jon:  Welcome back and we are going to veer of course a little today we have been doing a lot of things about small business and marketing and even social media but there is a little bit of tempest that has come up within the industry and actually it is something that we have talked about before just the actual item in question and at the same time it is something that I completed about a year ago so I have a little bit of a vested feeling about it and a little bit about pride of ownership and that is the CMM program through MPI. We are both CMPs and I have had that for a little over 10 years now and a couple of years ago I decided to pursue the CMM and I am not saying the CMM has a certificate or a certification right now because that is even one of the things in question but the key part of this is it was sort of the gold standard as someone put it in an article that I have read, it was really the top end and it took a certain level of experience and a certain commitment to go you had to spend a little over a week on site studying, you had to write an essay test and a business case or business plan at the end of it and so it was pretty rigorous and there are about close to a thousand, like 956 is one of the numbers I have heard people who have passed that program in about the last decade, 11 years or so that it has been offered.
Elizabeth:  And it is something that I have always wanted to do, I got my CMP as soon as I could, as soon as I had enough years to qualify and you know the requirements, I went through that program and was very proud to have accomplished that and the CMM was always kind of the next thing to do and the requirements you were at the industry for 10 years and had certain requirements and I had the last few years I have passed that requirement of having 10 years in the industry and so over the last couple of years I had been looking into it, getting CMM in itself but now the MPI is now proposing some changes and that is what we want to talk about today.
Jon:  Right, specifically I guess it was late last year the first press release came out and they had partnered with GBTA (Global Business Travel Association) and basically GBTA had a program- the Strategic Meetings Management Certification (SMMC) and I guess it had only been around a couple of years and basically the two organizations decided to partner and sort of combine forces on this.
Elizabeth:  And one of the things I heard somewhere else on another show was that MPI had sold the CMM program to GBTA, I think one of the order of my concern is that there is a lot of misinformation going around out there because a lot of people have strong feelings about the changes that have been made and there is a lot of people talking about the places but one of the misconceptions was that MPI just kind of sold it out but that isn’t the case they are partnering with GBTA which I do want to point out is a good thing, Jon and I have talked a lot on the podcast about how we wish our industry associations would work together more and not compete with each other, so that in a general sense I am happy that they are partnering with another industry association on something but I have been doing some research for a presentation I am doing at LABTA so the LA chapter of the Global Business Travel Association and I have been reading a lot of surveys that those folks have been taking and what I have learnt is that people who are corporate travel professionals are being asked to take on more meetings at events responsibilities at their company, a lot of them that work at these larger corporations the reason I think they had the SMMC was to kind of get some education and get a certification on how you would consolidate not only your travel program but your meetings management program and I think they go hand in hand. The one thing I don’t like about the  people that are opposed to some of the changes in giving the CMM designation to people that had previously earned the SMMC is I haven’t seen any discussion on what that certification required and that really I feel like moving forward we should all be on the same team you know especially since advocacy is such an issue these days I think belittling the work that corporate travel professionals do and making it seem like it isn’t as valuable, it isn’t as difficult intellectual as the work that meeting professionals do, I think doesn’t get us anywhere in that conversation.
Jon:  But I would take sort of a different view point in a way here because the people who earn the CMM was a very challenging program to go through and it required an expenditure of time and money and effort and whether or not it is true but there is certainly a perception that the people who earned this they just sort of qualify for this other thing without really saying here is why they qualify for it so that explanation part, that linkage is missing there and the people who have the CMM many of them feel very strongly that this is sort of a devaluation of their accomplishment and this was again considered like kind of the top thing it is like you aspired to get to that point after you had been in the industry for a while and to simply be told that all these other people just qualify for it without any further explanation is I think where some of these very strong reaction comes from.
Elizabeth:  Yeah and I think part of it is there is only a couple hundred people that have earned SMMC because it was only around for a couple of years versus like you mentioned it, it is almost a thousand people that got the CMM so they have a much louder voice, I am not surprised honestly we haven’t heard much from them because again I think the corporate travel industry and the meetings industry we often operate in silos, we have our separate associations and conferences that we attend and we don’t often, no one is crossing that barrier to say what is it that these folks accomplish, was it the same amount of time and effort and energy that they put into their designation what do they feel about it honestly I don’t know.
Jon:  Yeah there has been speculation I belong to a CMM group on Linked In and that group actually contains nearly 50% of all the CMMs in the world so it is a fairly substantial size group and there is just a lot of discomfort with that topic that whole idea of what did they do and it hasn’t been linked, it hasn’t been explained and it was never made clear and I think one thing that I have observed is I believe MPI had obviously no idea the fuse they were lighting when they did this the way they did it. It seems like they were a little, from everything that I have read a little deficient in reaching out to first off the community of the people who had this because we are all pretty easy to reach, there is a significant number of us who are MPI members, I just went through the program, they have got my email and it would have probably been easy to solicit some information and some buy in from let’s say out of 1,000 people they could have easily reached half of them right after that and instead my understanding of their focus groups was 4 people and I just don’t think they had any idea what they were stirring because the people who tend to have this designation they are very experienced, they are very confident people and they aren’t afraid to sort of make their opinions known.
Elizabeth:  And you think MPI would be used to this because they have had other issues in the past and people have gotten very upset about other things and today is aged with technology you know how easy it is to get feedback from your constituents, from your members in this case and a membership organization, MPI is a membership organization, the CMM isn’t the CMM is something that you earned and they got your money and just set you on your way so the solid truth is the way it is coming across I think to you and other people that have earned it is like ooh they have already gotten my money out of it so that is why they don’t really care what I think about it by lowering their requirements like some people would look at it, if they are able to just get a bunch more people in there and certified and get that much money out of so many more people then clearly it is an obvious business choice to make, it is kind of an oprenda.
Jon:  That is what is driving it.
Elizabeth:  Right that is what is driving it and the changes and the partnership you know all that it just makes financial sense obviously for them and clearly that was I think you know in my own blub that was the other reason they wouldn’t have necessarily consulted people that already had the CMM.
Jon:  That makes sense and I do think though that it was short sighted because obviously they have stirred up something and maybe not everyone who listens to podcast has heard this but I have seen it in numerous industry blogs and posts being discussed and certainly it is a big topic of conversation in some groups I belong to in Linked In and things like that so and even MPI I believe would admit it wasn’t rolled out in a way that was successful. And I know they have taken steps to solicit communication from people now they had some phone-inns and I participated in a lot of them and some listened in.
Elizabeth:  Right but did you feel like your questions or your concerns were being heard?
Jon:  Not completely and that is part of the problem too it has come across to sort of perfunctory and hoping that things will just sort of blow over and calm down and then they will just continue on with the course that they have set. There is a petition that has been signed and I know it asked for some specific things and from a lot of discussions there were some online surveys done for a significant portion of this group on Linked In for example who are all CMMs with some very specific requests that they are making back of MPI one of them being the 10 year requirement for eligibility and in actual kind of acceptance program because the way that it was rolled out and read it just seemed like sort of saying ooh I want to be in it and there was nothing to question that, beyond that it was sort of a self-qualification and I know to me there is a value in having to make that justification that I had the experience to take the program in the first place and I had to think it through to apply and to me it wasn’t just…
Elizabeth:  You know it seems like based on the chart that they have provided it seems like the eligibility requirements beyond the number of years of experience are very similar it is just that they have cut the number of years of experience in half they have dropped it from 10 down to 5 but otherwise you have to provide your resume and an essay and you have to get a recommendation which you know based on what they are saying here the qualifications it looks like I was pretty similar.
Jon:  Well I believe before that there was most of it there was an acceptance into the program.
Elizabeth:  Which I assume there would still be like and again because this is a financially motivated decision I am sure there is still some kind of acceptance process and who knows there might be somebody that they just say no you wanted it off the street like obviously given your resume and what you are bringing to the table this isn’t right for you but for the most part of course they are going to accept.
Jon:  But even the link to time of experience in the industry is actually in conflict with MPI standards that was set up a few years ago the EIBTA standards which many of them speak to having 8 years of experience as a minimum to be able to master particular skills within that knowledge base and so again that part feels again like well if it is 5 years we can get more money, more people in.
Elizabeth:  Yeah and I know somewhere in there a fake use or somewhere I think their justification for that was just that people are changing jobs more these days I guess asking somebody to be in the same industry for 10 years is asking a lot for people in this day and age which I can appreciate but.
Jon:  I don’t know but having the 20 year MPI member and I have been like 27 years in the industry and so maybe I am an acronyms but it just someone in some of our discussions made the point that that 10 years was also sort of a commitment by the time somebody has done that they are going to stick around.
Elizabeth:  Right and you don’t know honestly whether you are talking about meeting professionals or corporate travel professionals I actually agree that the 10 years I think probably should stay because if you are that kind of a person that is going to be selling to the sea level that you know you want to consolidate your travel programs or your meetings management program like you aren’t going to be somebody in all likelihood you know that has less than 10 years of experience in the industry or kind of doing this kind of work and so I think obviously it is just again financially motivated if we drop the requirements we can get more people to join and who knows whether that devalues what those of you that have already achieved it I am sure that again it is all about perception the people that have already achieved it their perception is going to be that devalues it maybe they can come up with some kind of compromise I don’t know if MPI is going to be willing to.
Jon:  They have said they are open to some modifications to the program but not very clearly they also said there are some non-negotiable and I think all of that is still out there to know what, where and how things are going to fit together. We have talked about the SMMC folks getting the CMM, I know you have an opinion on that that is pretty strong and at the same time it feels like handing someone something that isn’t specifically what they accomplished, kind of rubs the wrong way and I wouldn’t want it I mean if I were an SMMC instead of a CMM I am not sure I would want to use that title I mean I think maybe the logic behind it is since that program is going away they wanted these people to transition in and be considered at the same level with all of us but it was just handled so badly.
Elizabeth:  And if there were more of them you know come to think of it the SMMC required 7 years of experience so now dropping it down to 5 like you think they would be upset too and maybe they are who knows maybe they don’t want it and they have some of the same concerns.
Jon:  It would be interesting to hear their perspectives.
Elizabeth:  And you and I can certainly try to share this podcast in some of those circles and we would love to get their feedback and hear some of those perspectives too.
Jon:  Right well in fact we will mention this later but I very specifically wanted to really solicit feedback from people, we would love to have you email the podcast and let us know your comments and your thoughts on all of these and your opinions we will read some of those on the air we will try and maybe have people on because certainly this is something that a week from now it isn’t going to be gone away or even a month from now I think it has been a significant flare up and it will need to ultimately be addressed whether it is to people’s satisfaction or not is an entirely other point.
Elizabeth:  Yeah but opening it up to people that don’t have the CMM, who would be potential customers if you will of the program.
Jon:  And so I think I really do want to encourage people to comment back to us and we will try and have some other voices on here besides ours but also just continuing on there are a couple of other points that were brought up in this petition that I wanted to at least mention, one of them that still seems puzzling to me and I haven’t really ever had a good explanation is that they were taking away what CMM stood for and just calling it a stand-alone brand and on one hand they are saying well it is a strong enough trademark that it doesn’t need anything but if so then why would you undercut the naming of it.
Elizabeth:  Right there you got this seems bizarre and I agree with them that CMM is a brand, it is a very recognized world thing like we talked about it in the beginning it is something that once you’ve been around for a few years you know what it is, you aspire to get it so in that case yeah it is a strong stand alone brand but why they would just get rid of what it stands for which is Certificates Meetings Management especially since again my view point again on behalf of I guess the corporate travel planners that are coming into this given my research a lot of them are finding themselves doing more meetings management and that is why I feel like this is a good partnership so the name keeping it as Certificates Meeting Management would make sense, it doesn’t make sense to get rid of that.
Jon:  Yeah and I always wondered and the last part of this petition was the idea that if they can’t effect some of these changes can they call it something else? And there is a side of me that says you don’t want the designation you have to die out which is also true for the people with the SMMC I am sure they spent a lot of energy and time to do this and theirs is just disappearing whereas ours is just changing but I wondered if they couldn’t continue to offer like different tracks of it and do sort of like the CMP with the health side that they have recently rolled out which I think they did a much more masterful job honestly of bringing out a new certification within their designations and it simply is a CMPHC and why not make the CMM strategic travels or strategic meetings and give it a designation after the end so then you could even tell okay a CMM is an old school and now if you are CMMMT you are a meetings travels specialist.
Elizabeth:  But I think the reason they don’t do that is because the new content going forward is going to be largely meetings related not even meetings related it is all about being strategic.
Jon:  Right but the problem with that I think is the business plan that they have eliminated, the business case assessment doesn’t speak specifically to meetings or to travelers, to strategic, it is very broadly stated.
Elizabeth:  But you were always able to do a business plan on whatever you wanted to do.
Jon:  Right, but you needed to have it approved and that was a key step.
Elizabeth:  And you have some kind of business case to someone that needs more clarification obviously to the community like what it does that mean I know they have said in the FAQs so you can still do a business plan as part of your project that you have to do but maybe you choose to because I think what would be more applicable to other folks instead of a business plan you are putting together a plan to carry strategic business management program at your company.
Jon:  Which is really what probably about half of the people in my CMM class were doing, it was very interesting because at the very end of the program they divided us up by tables as to what our business plans were related to and there were a significant number of people who were simply implementing a strategic meetings plan within their organization that was their business plan they were writing.
Elizabeth: Which is why it makes sense for these two to combine?
Jon:  Of course I ended up at the other business table, I had this strange AV for planners thing that nobody could quite figure out yet and I guess that is one of the reasons I feel passionate about the CMM program the way that it was structured is because it was so addressed to my specific needs I understand change but I am not sure that all of this change is for the better and I think that has been a little bit of the issue throughout the community because everybody who got the CMM had their own reasons for doing it and has used that knowledge in whatever way they have decided to apply it to their world.
Elizabeth:  Knowledge and having the designation just like having the CMP might get you a job that if you didn’t have it you might not get the CMM is less or not HR circles but still it is kind of that designation that you know I know my stuff, I am a more strategic thinker you and I both know because we have contributed to the new CMP manual that the CIC is trying to make the CMP more strategic focused as well you know who knows 10 years down the road we can talk about this together and see how it has all changed.
Jon:  Yeah it is a very messy situation I think it was rolled out rather awkwardly and it is unfortunate because it has caused a lot of bruised feelings and I think on both sides I can’t speak for anybody else but I did a poll on one of the calls that I was on very clearly said that there is the perception that they are trying to devalue the CMM and he said what reason would we have for that and I can agree with that, what reason would they have to want to devalue this program.
Elizabeth:  Financially that wouldn’t make sense.
Jon:  Yes, which I think is the frustration a lot of people have from information gaps and lack of information and I think had it been rolled out a little cleaner they could have had an entire group of a thousand people advocating for it.
Elizabeth:  Exactly, what a missed opportunity.
Jon:  Yeah because I mean in our previous discussions well before any of this ever happened I encouraged you to go to CMM program repeatedly.
Elizabeth:  Yeah we have talked about it many times.
Jon:  Because I think that it was one of the best educational offerings in a compact amount of time that I have ever had the opportunity to do.
Elizabeth:   Well it was so valuable for me to listen to your story about what exactly it was like, I already wanted to do it and that is great but here you tell me what the whole week was like and you know what you learnt and that granted some of that potentially is changing anyway so now go to CMMs kit I guess advocate on it specifically about what it was like.
Jon:  And again had they brought us in we might have been able to you know here is what is the same, here is what is changing it just shouldn’t be change for change sake, and I think that is where I would probably leave from my side it is like let’s make sure that this prestigious great asset that MPI has built up isn’t undercut and isn’t thrown away casually into something else so that would be what I hope can come out of all this discussion.
Elizabeth:  Yeah so I hope that people will comment to us and send emails, hopefully we have reached somebody that maybe wasn’t in these other circles and they have an opinion or correction or something and hopefully we can help facilitate that.
Jon:  Absolutely so please email us and there will be all the information at the end of the podcast to reach us but we would love to hear your thoughts, your opinions and we would love to involve some of those in our future show. So appreciate you listening to our points of view or sort of the counter point here today on the CMM roll out and thank you and we look forward to talking to you next time.
Mike:  Well it is pretty interesting here about the CMM situation and I want to thank first of all Liz King and AJ Palate for their great advice on the tips of getting your attendees sharing the right content, you can find Liz at lizkingevents.com and you can also find here at techie talk, Liz could also be found on twitter at @lizkingevents and face book and she is very accessible and a really nice lady you should talk to her and check her at all her channels and also again thanks to AJ of Eventstagram they are from the UK and now in New York it looks like a really great product and also what a fantastic use of URL of Instagram which .am is end of that instead of .com and they can be found at @eventstagram on twitter. Also thank you to editor Barbra Scofidio and Sue Pelletier talking about the topic influencers and head over and download the free meetings net app you can find them at meetingsnet.com that is the main site and go ahead and download that app it is really cool I really enjoy it in fact they have a preview of the next one coming up which is even cooler you can find it at the apps store or Google play or even on the Amazon market place and Sue can be found at @spelletier, the meetings net twitter handle is @meetingsnet so check that out. I also wanted to thank Jon Trask from AV for planners and Elizabeth Glau from social media building blocks go over and check out both those websites of course you know if you have been listening to podcast at all you know Elizabeth has been around with working with us for a long time spending some time I thank her very much she is a very smart lady herself so they did a great job talking about the CMM program, you can email Jon at Jon@avforplanners, please go check out AV for planners, try the free RFP builder, Jon of course has a free evaluation for all the meetings podcast listeners so you can get an evaluation on your next meeting for all the AV and labor which is really cool it is a $1,500 value and it is really cool they do their valuation of 3 companies put them side by side and give you a summary of those companies so you know what you are getting from them so it is a pretty cool deal so I would go that and of course I am working on that with Jon so just email Jon tell them you heard about it on the show and you want to redeem one credit, it is that simple. Lastly please go on to the iTunes and give us a review really would appreciate that leave a review, hopefully a nice review but if you want to put a bad one there go ahead and do it we just want to learn and change up the podcast and the very last thing I want to say is go on to Instagram and take a picture of yourself while listening to the show I would really like to see that I think it would be really cool then I can use it if you want on our actual show page and it will come up when people are listening to it so they can see you wherever you are, use #meetingspodcast. So if you have any questions or comments about anything to do with the show or anything else you want to talk to me send in an email at meetingspodcast (at)gmail.com., you can call me on my cell phone at 9256993190 I would love to talk to you, this is Mike McAllen I hope you enjoyed the show and I will see you next week

284 Meetings Podcast|Virtual Assistants, No Shows, AV Tips

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Thanks for listening to the Meetings Podcast.  The Meetings Podcast is sponsored by IMEX America and AVforPlanners.com
Todays show features Host Mike McAllen from Grass Shack Events & Media.
Segment producers
***Julius Solaris presents: ‘Hack Your Event – Shortcuts, Tips and Tricks to Make Your Planning Easier’   Todays show is Avoid No-Shows at Events one of the biggest plagues affecting our industry, no-shows.
- Using secondhand exchanges
- Delaying Charges
- Online Check-in
Get more information at http://eventmanagerblog.com/avoid-no-shows from the Event Manager Blog (Eventmanagerblog.com)
Read Julius popular blog Event Manager Blog (http://eventmanagerblog.com ) or follow @EventMB on Twitter (twitter.com/eventmb)  You can reach Julius on Twitter (http://twitter.com/tojulius) or at http://JuliusSolaris.com
***Jon Trask presents: Five tips to keep in mind about facilities from an AV perspective
-Room capacity charts can lie.
-Ceiling heights really do matter.Power is more than having a few wall plugs available.
-In house vendors may have contractual rules that you must adhere to.
-Those speakers up in the ceiling are good for some meetings…and really bad for others.
Get more information from Jon at AVforPlanners.com.  You can find Jon at Jon(At)AVforPlanners.com
Jon has offer a free show evaluation to Meetings Planners and organizers for their next meeting. A $1500 value. All you have to do is email Jon and say you heard the offer on the podcast.
*** Jonathan Shank from Learn To Find, Manage, and Hire Your First Virtual Assistant!
Jonathan discusses how using Virtual Assistants can make you more efficient with your time and money. He also gives shares his Apple method for finding Virtual Assistants. I added an S. So Apples.
Website: YourFirstVirtualAssistant.com
Twitter: @YFVAJonathan
Podcast: Your First Virtual Assistant

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The Meeting Planners podcast source for what’s new and exciting in meetings and events industry

Here are the transcripts brought to you by Joyce!

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Meetings industry karma, and the ghosts of the past year – Show 283

karma 300x281 Meetings industry karma, and the ghosts of the past year   Show 283Meetings industry karma, and the ghosts of the past year
For their last show of the 2013, Jon Trask and Elizabeth Glau take a cue from “A Christmas Carol” and discuss how the ghosts of past (year) and bad karma from your dealings with other industry professionals can come back to haunt your future in the meetings industry. Worse still, there are the bad ethical decisions and the chain rattling of those decisions that can follow someone for years.

Whether it’s small things, like ignoring people you don’t think can “help” you on social media; or big things, like making vendors bid under false pretenses. They look at some of the bad karma things that they’ve both seen people do. But, since it’s also a season of joy, they talk about some of the good karma that they’ve seen as well, and how having honest conversations and actions can create good karma to banish those ghosts and lead to better relationships with peers, customers and vendors.

From the Meetings Podcast, Grass Shack Events & Media, AVforPlanners and Building Blocks Social Media.

We wish you the very best of holidays; and successful and prosperous new year.

Affiliate Marketing for Events With Karen Garcia- Show 281

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Karen Garcia GTO Management

Mike talks with Karen Garcia of GTO Management. Mike met Karen at the New Media Expo and was so impressed with this years work of GTO Management he is going to the show this January 4-6 at the Rio Hotel and Casino in Las Vegas.    Here is a link to Save 20% on your NMX 2014

Karen discusses how affiliate marketing for events works, affiliate networks, coupon codes, promotions and much more.

Karen Garcia, CEO of the affiliate program management company, GTO Management, has fifteen years of experience in e-commerce and marketing. Since 1999, she has consulted on and profitably managed dozens of affiliate programs on many different network platforms ranging from large national brands to niche merchants. She was awarded the 2009 ShareASale “Pay It Forward” Award for Industry Advocate for her work, speaks often at conferences, and has several published industry articles. She has served on the Board of Directors for the Performance Marketing Association for three terms and as Secretary for the board since halfway through her first term.

 

If you want to connect with Karen to discuss affiliate marketing for your next event email her at karen at gtomanagement.com

 Affiliate Marketing for Events With Karen Garcia  Show 281

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Event Marketing Strategist Michelle Bruno- Show 280

Michelle Bruno  Event Marketing Strategist Michelle Bruno  Show 280

Mike welcomes Michelle Bruno – Event Marketing Strategist from The Bruno Group Signature Events, Event Tech Brief and The Fork in the Road blog.

Michelle also shares a little bit about BOB.tv where they are making video and audio content work for event professionals and their audiences.

Michelle is best know as a business writer, blogger, content marketer in live meetings industry. Specialist in event-industry technology.

  Event Marketing Strategist Michelle Bruno  Show 280